PYO Pumpkin Patch

Yorkshire Pumpkins is inviting families to come down to their pumpkin patch in Cundall, Thirsk, this half term for a “pick your own pumpkin” experience! Open from 20th-31st October there will be a huge variety of pumpkins, home made refreshments and activities for children of all ages to enjoy!

The Battle’s Over!

Langthorpe Parish council are hosting a beacon in conjunction with over 1000 other sites across the UK to celebrate ‘The Battle’s Over’, a tribute to mark the 100th anniversary of the end of the First World War.

The beacon will be lit at 7 pm on Sunday the 11th November at the top of Back Lane, Langthorpe.

There will be no parking! The best access will be from Leeming Lane walking along the footpath to the south of East View or walking up Back Lane.

We Need Your Help!

newsflashCould you spare an hour or two each month to help with any of these things?

Don’t be shy!!  We need your help to keep publishing and delivering Lower Ure News.

The jobs we need help with include:

  • Counting out the papers into bundles for the distributors to collect.
  • Letting distributors know when they are ready to collect.
  • Liaising with advertisers.
  • Sending invoices to advertisers
  • Writing articles/features/photographs

If you think you can provide any help, no matter how small, please email volunteer@lowerurenews.co.uk or phone 01423 325808.

A big thankyou to everyone who is already helping us.

Village Roots Revisited

On Friday 12th January 2018, local historian Tony Hunt will deliver an illustrated lecture updating his history of Marton cum Grafton at the village’s memorial Hall, starting at 7.30pm. Followed by a virtual tour of a little visited private museum with new information about its curator, and a re-launch of the Village History Group. Ticket price: £7.50 (includes glass of wine/soft drink and nibbles). Tickets on sale at Spellows Village Shop or telephone Tony Hunt (07977 447712) or Keith Lumsden (07876 136975). Proceeds to be divided between Christ Church and the re-launched Village History Group.

ROECLIFFE WI – A VILLAGE INSTITUTION

In March 16th 1933 Roecliffe WI was inaugurated by Lady Lawson-Tancred. Miss Tankard of Whixley outlined the object and aims of The Women’s Institute.  The first bank account was in the Penny Bank and the first social evening was held in December with optional fancy dress. The first President was Mrs Greene, Secretary Lady Lawson-Tancred and Treasurer Miss Troller.

Trawling through the minute books from 1933 onwards, the most striking thing is the degree of social change between then and now.  Lack of transport meant that social life revolved around the village and its inhabitants and Roecliffe WI was at the forefront of organising socials, whist drives, plays, concerts, dances, children’s parties, etc.  They had a captive audience as there was no competition from television, foreign holidays, trips to London, visits away to look after grandchildren, etc.  Money was limited and entertainment was home-made and local.  Outings were arranged for members, their families and guests.  Speakers spoke mainly on craft-related items or home economic topics, but the wartime minutes make for interesting reading. During the Second world war, in common with WIs throughout England and Wales, Roecliffe WI raised funds for Red Cross, WI Ambulance Fund and local causes such as the Searchlight Unit. It knitted copiously for the troops and provided gifts for all the local boys who were called up. It began First Aid classes for those at home.

Throughout its time Roecliffe WI has been the champion, and often the instigator, of many local initiatives. These include bringing electric lights to the village, starting a bus service, creating safe footpaths, supporting the first Parish Council, filling in the unsafe pond on the village green, campaigning for more council houses, planting trees on the green, providing and maintaining seats in the village and proposing that Roecliffe become a conservation Area.
In more recent times, Roecliffe continues to be a reservoir of a multitude of skills and hobbies, demonstrated in our successful entries of craft, baking and flower arranging classes in the Great Yorkshire Show, and in our very successful and enjoyable Murder Mystery evening.
Like WIs throughout the world, Roecliffe WI has been a powerful voice both locally and nationally. Their hard work, fund-raising and lobbying have changed the face of society as well as educating and inspiring women for more than 100 years. The organisation is now enjoying a resurgence and renaissance and proves that the original values and mission are as relevant today as in the beginning. Visitors and new members are always welcome at our monthly meetings, held on the second Friday in the month in Roecliffe School.

Contact Helen Davison 01423 325677/07879333563.

Matinee Film Club

We will run a trial showing in October on a Monday, January 22 at 2pm in Coronation Hall.  Cost £5 including tea and biscuits.
For more details contact Jane Barber on 01423 325 808 or e-mail chair @ yorevision.org.uk if you are interested.

Great Ouseburn Beer Festival

The eighth annual Great Ouseburn Beer Festival will be held on Saturday 7th October from 1pm till 11pm.

There will be live music from two fantastic local bands. No Direction take to the stage first, followed by Citizen Smith to close the night. There will be over 20 beers, ciders, Fizz and hot food served all day.

The festival has now raised in excess of £40,000 for local charities including Open Country, Henshaws College, Jennyruth Workshops, Candlelighters and St Michael’s Hospice, along with Great Ouseburn Village Organisations including the Village Hall, Cricket Club, Football Club, Primary School and both Ouseburn Parish Churches. This year we continue to support the Great Ouseburn Village Organisations along with The Yorkshire Air Ambulance and Harrogate based Sir Robert Ogden Macmillan Centre.

For more information, see www.greatouseburnbeerfestival.co.uk

 

 

Minskip Midsummer Family Fete

MinskipFeteCome and join us for a great family afternoon at Minskip Midsummer Family Fete! In aid of St John’s Church, Minskip. Lunch – Barbecue, Salads & Pudding. Children’s Games, Auction of promises, Live Music from The Palm Court Dance Orchestra, Treasure Hunt, Stalls & Bar. Children’s Fancy Dress – Prizes! Tombola. Old photos of Minskip on display. Adults £10, Children £5 (Under 5’s free). Family of 4 £25. For tickets, call 01423 323939 or 01423 322712.

Easter Walking Festival

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The walking group outside Myton Hall

Over 350 people enjoyed nine walks during the fifth Boroughbridge Walkers Are Welcome Easter Walking Festival.

The festival had a mixture of weather, but heavy rain on Easter Sunday morning did not deter people from the Marton-le-Moor Parish Walk, which provides an opportunity to look at the area’s past.

Organisers added a map reading training event to the festival for the first time, combined with a short three-mile circuit around Kirby Hill and Langthorpe. Attendance was not high, but there was good feedback from those who took part.

The sun shone for the ever-popular Myton-on-Swale and Battle of Myton Walk on Easter Monday with the temptation of an excellent tea at the end drawing in 75 people. The tea raised £300 for St Mary’s church at Myton.

This four-mile circular walk starts with a brief history of Myton’s Grade II* listed church, which was built in the 13th century, before walkers went to look at Myton Hall, styled on a French chateau, which was the seat of the Staypleton family from around 1693 and more recently the home of the late Sir Ken Morrison.

Nick Ramsden, who owns Myton Stud Farm with his brother Nigel, gave walkers an insight into agriculture on the 1,100-acre estate bought by their grandfather in 1933. It once employed around 30 people but today it is run by three.

The Stud Farm, where trotting ponies were bred, was built in 1870 and has been painstakingly restored. It is part of the Home Farm, which was designed in accordance with plans exhibited at the great Exhibition of 1851. Today the farmland is managed with the interests of wildlife as one of its priorities.

Myton 10

Irene Robinson speaking about the restoration of Myton-on-Swale Bridge and the battle in 1319

The walk ended at the bridge over the River Swale, close to where the Battle of Myton was fought on September 20th, 1319. Irene Robinson, one of the leaders of the successful campaign to have the bridge restored, spoke about that project and gave details of the battle between forces led by the Archbishop of York, William Melton, and Scots raiders under the command of James Douglas and Thomas Randolph.

Three new routes were well received with The Rabbit Hill Walk proving popular with people who wanting a slightly longer, more challenging afternoon, with the opportunity to explore little know valleys to the east of the A168 leading to Marton-cum-Grafton.

Group chairman Barry MacCallum said “Thanks to support from Boroughbridge Chamber of Trade and sponsorship by local businesses, the event gave the town a festive air – particularly with shop windows dressed for the Easter Bonnets competition and treasure hunt clues.”

He also thanked the Hightimers amateur dramatics group for organising the Ghost walk, the Friends of Roman Aldborough for giving a guided tour on the Roman Ramble and the Boroughbridge Lions for stewarding.